Three new financial services tenants at Harbor Point

Building and Land Technology (BLT) has announced the arrival of three new companies which will set up their respective headquarters at the Harbor Point complex in Stamford.

The new tenants are Tomo Networks, a fintech start-up focused on improving the home buying experience for buyers; NewEdge Wealth, a boutique wealth management company; and global investment firm Schonfeld Strategic Advisors. The three companies will occupy a combined space of 49,000 square feet.

“We are delighted to welcome these world-class businesses to the thriving Harbor Point of Stamford,” said Carl R. Kuehner III, President of BLT. “Together, they join a growing list of leading corporate tenants who have contributed to the historic and unprecedented growth that has taken place in Stamford in the past year alone. These companies bring success, talent and a team that will strengthen Stamford’s position as a home to leading financial services icons. “

Tomo Networks was assisted in the transaction by Newmark, while NewEdge Wealth was represented by CBRE and Schonfeld by JLL.

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Phil Hall’s writing for Westfair Communications has won several awards from the Connecticut Press Club and the Connecticut Society of Professional Journalists. He is a former United Nations-based reporter for Fairchild Broadcast News and the author of 10 books (including the 2020 version “Moby Dick: The Radio Play” and the upcoming “Jesus Christ Movie Star”, both published by BearManor Media) . He is also the host of the SoundCloud podcast “The Online Movie Show”, co-host of the WAPJ-FM talk show “Nutmeg Chatter” and a writer with credits in The New York Times, New York Daily News, Hartford Courant, Wired, The Hill’s Congress Blog, Profit Confidential, The MReport, and StockNews.com. Outside of journalism, he’s also a horror movie actor – typically playing the creepy villain who is badly killed at the end of every movie.

Stephen V. Lee