EAGLE FINANCIAL SERVICES INC Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations (Form 10-Q)

The purpose of this discussion is to focus on the important factors affecting
the Company's financial condition, results of operations, liquidity and capital
resources. This discussion should be read in conjunction with the Company's
Consolidated Financial Statements and the Notes to the Consolidated Financial
Statements presented in Part I, Item 1, Financial Statements, of this Form 10-Q
and Item 8, Financial Statements and Supplementary Data, of the 2021 Form 10-K.

GENERAL

Eagle Financial Services, Inc. is a bank holding company which owns 100% of the
stock of Bank of Clarke County (the "Bank" and, collectively with Eagle
Financial Services, Inc., the "Company", "we", "us" or "our"). Accordingly, the
results of operations for the Company are dependent upon the operations of the
Bank. The Bank conducts a commercial banking business which consists of
attracting deposits from the general public and investing those funds in
commercial, consumer and real estate loans and municipal and U.S. government
agency securities. The Bank's deposits are insured by the Federal Deposit
Insurance Corporation to the maximum extent permitted by law. At March 31, 2022,
the Company had total assets of $1.37 billion, net loans of $1.01 billion, total
deposits of $1.23 billion, and shareholders' equity of $102.1 million. The
Company's net income was $3.25 million for the three months ended March 31,
2022.

COVID-19 and related response

The COVID-19 crisis has changed our communities, both in the way we live and the
way we do business. While circumstances continue to change at a rapid pace, the
Company is steadfastly working to meet and exceed the needs of its customers,
employees and the communities in which it does business. The Company, while
considered an essential business, has implemented procedures to protect its
employees, customers and the community and still serve their banking needs.
Branch lobbies are open, but with enhanced safety features for employees and
customers. Our customers also continue to conduct their business via automated
teller machines, online banking and our call center. In efforts to assist local
businesses during this pandemic, the Company approved 1,372 Small Business
Association Paycheck Protection Program ("SBA PPP") loans, totaling $132.1
million during the first and second rounds of the SBA PPP. The outstanding
balance of SBA PPP loans as of March 31, 2022 was $8.3 million. The Company has
also worked with local small businesses, consumers and other commercial
customers through its loan deferral program whereby customers experiencing
hardships due to COVID-19 may be granted a deferral in loan payments for up to
six months. During the year ended December 31, 2020, the Company approved 255
deferrals of interest and/or principal payments with respect to loan balances
totaling $130.5 million at December 31, 2020 for its customers experiencing
hardships related to COVID-19. During the first quarter of 2021, the Company
approved two additional deferrals of interest and/or principal with respect to
loan balances totaling $41 thousand. No additional deferrals have been made
since the first quarter of 2021. As of March 31, 2022, all of the loans for
which the Company had approved deferrals had begun making payments on their
loans after the deferral period had passed.

MANAGEMENT STRATEGY

The Company strives to be an outstanding financial institution in its market by
building solid sustainable relationships with: (1) its customers, by providing
highly personalized customer service, a network of conveniently placed branches
and ATMs, a competitive variety of products/services and courteous, professional
employees, (2) its employees, by providing generous benefits, a positive work
environment, advancement opportunities and incentives to exceed expectations,
(3) its communities, by participating in local concerns, providing monetary
support, supporting employee volunteerism and providing employment
opportunities, and (4) its shareholders, by providing sound profits and returns,
sustainable growth, regular dividends and committing to its local, independent
status.

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OPERATIONAL STRATEGY

The Bank is a locally owned and managed financial institution. This allows the
Bank to be flexible and responsive in the products and services it offers. The
Bank grows primarily by lending funds to local residents and businesses at a
competitive price that reflects the inherent risk of lending. The Bank attempts
to fund these loans through deposits gathered from local residents and
businesses. The Bank prices its deposits by comparing alternative sources of
funds and selecting the lowest cost available. When deposits are not adequate to
fund asset growth, the Bank relies on borrowings, both short and long term. The
Bank's primary source of borrowed funds is the Federal Home Loan Bank of Atlanta
which offers numerous terms and rate structures to the Bank.

As interest rates change, the Bank attempts to maintain its net interest margin.
This is accomplished by changing the price, terms, and mix of its financial
assets and liabilities. The Bank also earns fees on services provided through
its trust department, sales of investments through Eagle Investment Services,
secondary market mortgage activities, and deposit operations. The Bank also
incurs noninterest expenses such as compensating employees, maintaining and
acquiring fixed assets, and purchasing goods and services necessary to support
its daily operations.

The Bank has a marketing department which seeks to develop new business. This is
accomplished through an ongoing calling program whereby account officers visit
with existing and potential customers to discuss the products and services
offered. The Bank also utilizes traditional advertising such as television
commercials, radio ads, newspaper ads, and billboards.

LOAN POLICIES

Administration and supervision over the lending process is provided by the
Bank's Credit Administration Department. The principal risk associated with the
Bank's loan portfolio is the creditworthiness of its borrowers. In an effort to
manage this risk, the Bank's policy gives loan amount approval limits to
individual loan officers based on their position and level of experience. Credit
risk is increased or decreased, depending on the type of loan and prevailing
economic conditions. In consideration of the different types of loans in the
portfolio, the risk associated with real estate mortgage loans, commercial loans
and consumer loans varies based on employment levels, consumer confidence,
fluctuations in the value of real estate and other conditions that affect the
ability of borrowers to repay debt.

The Company has written policies and procedures to help manage credit risk. The
Company utilizes a loan review process that includes formulation of portfolio
management strategy, guidelines for underwriting standards and risk assessment,
procedures for ongoing identification and management of credit deterioration,
and regular portfolio reviews to establish loss exposure and to ascertain
compliance with the Company's policies.

The Bank uses a tiered approach to approve credit requests consisting of
individual lending authorities, joint approval of Category I officers, and a
director loan committee. Lending limits for individuals are set by the Board of
Directors and are determined by loan purpose, collateral type, and internal risk
rating of the borrower. The highest individual authority (Category I) is
assigned to the Bank's President / Chief Executive Officer, Chief Revenue
Officer and Chief Credit Officer (approval authority only). Two officers in
Category I may combine their authority to approve loan requests to borrowers
with credit exposure up to $10.0 million on a secured basis and $6.0 million
unsecured; and the three Category I Officers can combine to approve loan
requests to borrowers with credit exposure up to $15.0 million on a secured
basis and $9.0 million unsecured. Officers in Category II, III, IV, V, VI and
VII have lesser authorities and with approval of a Category I officer may extend
loans to borrowers with exposure of $5.0 million on a secured basis and $3.0
million unsecured. Officers in Categories A through F can also utilize the
co-approval of the Regional and Small Business Credit Officers to extend loans
with exposures up to $2.5 million and $1.5 million respectively on a secured
basis, and up to $1 million and $750 thousand respectively on an unsecured
basis. Loans exceeding $15.0 million and up to the Bank's legal lending limit
can be approved by the Director Loan Committee consisting of four directors
(three directors constituting a quorum). The Director's Loan Committee also
reviews and approves changes to the Bank's Loan Policy as presented by
management.

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The following sections discuss the major categories of loans within the total loan portfolio:

Residential real estate loans for one to four families

Residential lending activity may be generated by the Bank's loan officer
solicitations, referrals by real estate professionals, and existing or new bank
customers. Loan applications are taken by a Bank loan officer. As part of the
application process, information is gathered concerning income, employment and
credit history of the applicant. The valuation of residential collateral is
provided by independent fee appraisers who have been approved by the Bank's
Directors Loan Committee. In connection with residential real estate loans, the
Bank requires title insurance, hazard insurance and, if applicable, flood
insurance. In addition to traditional residential mortgage loans secured by a
first or junior lien on the property, the Bank offers home equity lines of
credit.

Commercial real estate loans

Commercial real estate loans are secured by various types of commercial real
estate in the Bank's market area, including multi-family residential buildings,
commercial buildings and offices, small shopping centers and churches.
Commercial real estate loan originations are obtained through broker referrals,
direct solicitation of developers and continued business from customers. In its
underwriting of commercial real estate, the Bank's loan to original appraised
value ratio is generally 80% or less. Commercial real estate lending entails
significant additional risk as compared with residential mortgage lending.
Commercial real estate loans typically involve larger loan balances concentrated
with single borrowers or groups of related borrowers. Additionally, the
repayment of loans secured by income producing properties is typically dependent
on the successful operation of a business or a real estate project and thus may
be subject, to a greater extent, to adverse conditions in the real estate market
or the economy, in general. The Bank's commercial real estate loan underwriting
criteria require an examination of debt service coverage ratios, the borrower's
creditworthiness, prior credit history and reputation, and the Bank typically
requires personal guarantees or endorsements of the borrowers' principal owners.

Loans for construction and land development

The Bank makes local construction loans, primarily residential, and land
acquisition and development loans. The construction loans are secured by
residential houses under construction and the underlying land for which the loan
was obtained. The average life of most construction loans is less than one year
and the Bank offers both fixed and variable rate interest structures. The
interest rate structure offered to customers depends on the total amount of
these loans outstanding and the impact of the interest rate structure on the
Bank's overall interest rate risk. There are two characteristics of construction
lending which impact its overall risk as compared to residential mortgage
lending. First, there is more concentration risk due to the extension of a large
loan balance through several lines of credit to a single developer or
contractor. Second, there is more collateral risk due to the fact that loan
funds are provided to the borrower based upon the estimated value of the
collateral after completion. This could cause an inaccurate estimate of the
amount needed to complete construction or an excessive loan-to-value ratio. To
mitigate the risks associated with construction lending, the Bank generally
limits loan amounts to 80% of the estimated appraised value of the finished
construction project. The Bank also obtains a first lien on the property as
security for its construction loans and typically requires personal guarantees
from the borrower's principal owners. Finally, the Bank performs inspections of
the construction projects to ensure that the percentage of construction
completed correlates with the amount of draws on the construction line of
credit.

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Commercial and industrial loans

Commercial business loans generally have more risk than residential mortgage
loans, but have higher yields. To manage these risks, the Bank generally obtains
appropriate collateral and personal guarantees from the borrower's principal
owners and monitors the financial condition of its business borrowers.
Residential mortgage loans generally are made on the basis of the borrower's
ability to make repayment from employment and other income and are secured by
real estate whose value tends to be readily ascertainable. In contrast,
commercial business loans typically are made on the basis of the borrower's
ability to make repayment from cash flow from its business and are secured by
business assets, such as commercial real estate, accounts receivable, equipment
and inventory. As a result, the availability of funds for the repayment of
commercial business loans is substantially dependent on the success of the
business itself. Furthermore, the collateral for commercial business loans may
depreciate over time and generally cannot be appraised with as much precision as
residential real estate. Refer to the Marine Lending section below for
discussion of additional commercial and industrial lending.

consumer loan

The Bank offers various secured and unsecured consumer loans, which include
personal installment loans, personal lines of credit, automobile loans, and
credit card loans. The Bank originates its consumer loans within its geographic
market area and these loans are generally made to customers with whom the Bank
has an existing relationship. Consumer loans generally entail greater risk than
residential mortgage loans, particularly in the case of consumer loans which are
unsecured or secured by rapidly depreciable assets such as automobiles. In such
cases, any repossessed collateral on a defaulted consumer loan may not provide
an adequate source of repayment of the outstanding loan balance as a result of
the greater likelihood of damage, loss or depreciation. Consumer loan
collections are dependent on the borrower's continuing financial stability, and
thus are more likely to be adversely affected by job loss, divorce, illness or
personal bankruptcy. Furthermore, the application of various federal and state
laws, including federal and state bankruptcy and insolvency laws, may limit the
amount which can be recovered on such loans.

The underwriting standards employed by the Bank for consumer loans include a
determination of the applicant's payment history on other debts and an
assessment of ability to meet existing obligations and payments on the proposed
loan. The stability of the applicant's monthly income may be determined by
verification of gross monthly income from primary employment, and from any
verifiable secondary income. Although creditworthiness of the applicant is the
primary consideration, the underwriting process also includes an analysis of the
value of the security in relation to the proposed loan amount.

Refer to the Marine Loans section below for a discussion of additional consumer loans.

Marine Lending

The Bank's marine lending unit includes originated retail loans, which are
classified as commercial and industrial loans or consumer loans, depending on
the borrower, and dealer floorplan loans, which are classified as commercial and
industrial loans. The Company's relationships are limited to well established
dealers of global premium brand manufacturers. The Company's top three
manufacturer customers have been in business between 30 and 100 years. The
Company primarily has secured agreements with premium manufacturers to support
dealer floor plan loans which may reduce the Company's credit exposure to the
dealer, despite its underwriting of each respective dealer. The Company has
developed incentive retail pricing programs with the dealers to drive retail
dealer flow. Retail loans are generally limited to premium manufacturers with
established relationships with the Company which have a vested interest in the
secondary market pricing of their respective brand due to the limited inventory
available for resale. Consequently, while not contractually committed,
manufacturers will often support secondary resale values which can have the
effect of reducing losses from non-performing retail marine loans. Retail
borrowers generally have very high credit scores, substantial down payments,
substantial net worth, personal liquidity, and excess cash flow.

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CRITICAL ACCOUNTING POLICIES

The financial statements of the Company are prepared in accordance with
accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America
("GAAP"). The financial information contained within these statements is, to a
significant extent, based on measurements of the financial effects of
transactions and events that have already occurred. A variety of factors could
affect the ultimate value that is obtained when earning income, recognizing an
expense, recovering an asset or relieving a liability. In addition, GAAP itself
may change from one previously acceptable method to another method. Although the
economics of the transactions would be the same, the timing of events that would
impact the transactions could change.

Allowance for loan losses

The allowance for loan losses is an estimate of the probable losses inherent in
the Company's loan portfolio. As required by GAAP, the allowance for loan losses
is accrued when the occurrence of losses is probable and they can be
estimated. Impairment losses are accrued based on the differences between the
loan balance and the value of its collateral, the present value of future cash
flows, or the price established in the secondary market. The Company's allowance
for loan losses has three basic components: the general allowance, the specific
allowance and the unallocated allowance. Each of these components is determined
based upon estimates that can and do change when actual events occur. The
general allowance uses historical experience and other qualitative factors to
estimate future losses and, as a result, the estimated amount of losses can
differ significantly from the actual amount of losses which would be incurred in
the future. However, the potential for significant differences is mitigated by
continuously updating the loss history of the Company. The specific allowance is
based upon the evaluation of specific impaired loans on which a loss may be
realized. Factors such as past due history, ability to pay, and collateral value
are used to identify those loans on which a loss may be realized. Each of these
loans is then evaluated to determine how much loss is estimated to be realized
on its disposition. The sum of the losses on the individual loans becomes the
Company's specific allowance. This process is inherently subjective and actual
losses may be greater than or less than the estimated specific allowance. The
unallocated allowance is due to imprecision in the model and for losses that are
not directly allocable to a specific loan type within the portfolio. As the
loans, which are affected by these events, are identified or losses are
experienced on the loans which are affected by these events, they will be
reflected within the specific or general allowances. Note 1 to the Consolidated
Financial Statements presented in Item 8, Financial Statements and Supplementary
Data, of the 2021 Form 10-K, provides additional information related to the
allowance for loan losses.

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FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS

The Company makes forward looking statements in this report that are subject to
risks and uncertainties. These forward looking statements include statements
regarding our expectations, intentions or objectives concerning our
profitability, liquidity, allowance for loan losses, interest rate sensitivity,
market risk, growth strategy, and financial and other goals. The words
"believes," "expects," "may," "will," "should," "projects," "contemplates,"
"anticipates," "forecasts," "intends," or other similar words or terms are
intended to identify forward looking statements. These forward looking
statements are subject to significant uncertainties because they are based upon
or are affected by factors including:

• the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic, including on the Company’s credit

quality and business operations, as well as its impact on the general economy

and financial market conditions;

• the ability to successfully manage growth or implement growth strategies if

      the Bank is unable to identify attractive markets, locations or
      opportunities to expand in the future or if the Bank is unable to
      successfully integrate new branches, business lines or other growth
      opportunities into its existing operations;

• competition with other banks and financial institutions, and companies

      outside of the banking industry, including those companies that have
      substantially greater access to capital and other resources;


  • the successful management of interest rate risk;

• the risks inherent in the granting of loans such as the risk of repayment and the fluctuation

collateral values;

• changes in general economic and business conditions in the Bank’s market

district;

• dependence on the Bank’s management team, including the ability to attract and

      retain key personnel;


  • changes in interest rates and interest rate policies;


  • maintaining capital levels adequate to support growth;

• maintain cost control and asset quality as new branches are opened or

      acquired;


  • demand, development and acceptance of new products and services;


  • problems with technology utilized by the Bank;


  • changing trends in customer profiles and behavior;

• changes in banking, tax and other laws and regulations and interpretations

or advice thereunder; and

• other factors described in Section 1A., “Risk Factors”, in the Company’s 2021 Report

Form10-K.

Due to these uncertainties, actual future results may differ materially from the results indicated by these forward-looking statements. In addition, past operating results are not necessarily indicative of future results.

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RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

Net Income

Net income for the three months ended March 31, 2022 was $3.25 million, an
increase of 13.56% or $388 thousand when compared to the same period in 2021.
Earnings per share, basic and diluted were $0.94 and $0.84 for the three months
ended March 31, 2022 and 2021, respectively.

Return on average assets ("ROA") measures how efficiently the Company uses its
assets to produce net income. Some issues reflected within this efficiency
include the Company's asset mix, funding sources, pricing, fee generation, and
cost control. The ROA of the Company, on an annualized basis, for the three
months ended March 31, 2022 and 2021 was 0.99% and 1.02%, respectively.

Return on average equity ("ROE") measures the utilization of shareholders'
equity in generating net income. This measurement is affected by the same
factors as ROA with consideration to how much of the Company's assets are funded
by shareholders. The ROE of the Company, on an annualized basis, for the three
months ended March 31, 2022 and 2021 was 12.15% and 11.04%, respectively.

Net interest income

Net interest income is our primary source of revenue, representing the
difference between interest and fees earned on interest-earning assets and the
interest paid on deposits and other interest-bearing liabilities. The level of
net interest income is impacted primarily by variations in the volume and mix of
these assets and liabilities, as well as changes in interest rates. Net interest
income was $11.1 million and $9.5 million for the three months ended March 31,
2022 and 2021, respectively, which represents an increase of $1.6 million or
16.9%. Net interest income increased primarily due to the increase in the
average balance of the loan portfolio and the decrease in interest expense on
deposits. Average interest earning assets increased $180.9 million when
comparing the three months ended March 31, 2021 to the three months ended
March 31, 2022 while the average yield on earning assets decreased by eight
basis points over that same period. This decrease in yield can be mostly
attributed to the current interest rate environment.

Total interest income was $11.5 million and $10.0 million for the three months
ended March 31, 2022 and 2021, respectively, which represents an increase of
$1.5 million or 15.0%. The increase in interest income was driven by an increase
in the average balance of the loan portfolio. Total interest expense was $370
thousand and $487 thousand for the three months ended March 31, 2022 and 2021,
respectively, which represents a decrease of $117 thousand or 24.0%. The
majority of deposit growth has been in non-maturity deposit accounts which have
traditionally paid a lower interest rate than maturity deposit accounts. The
growth in non-interest bearing and lower interest rate deposit accounts and the
reduction in higher interest rate accounts as well as repricing of those
accounts, has resulted in a lower rate paid on interest bearing liabilities.

The net interest margin was 3.61% and 3.62% for the three months ended March 31,
2022 and 2021, respectively. Tax-equivalent net interest income is calculated by
adding the tax benefit on certain securities and loans, whose interest is
tax-exempt, to total interest income then subtracting total interest expense.
The tax rate used to calculate the tax benefit was 21% for 2022 and 2021.

Given the anticipation of higher interest rates, net interest income and net interest margin may see some improvement as interest-earning assets generally revalue at a faster pace than passives.

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The following table shows interest income on earning assets and related average
yields as well as interest expense on interest-bearing liabilities and related
average rates paid for the three months ended March 31, 2022 and 2021 (dollars
in thousands):

                                       March 31, 2022                                March 31, 2021
                                           Interest       Average                        Interest       Average
                            Average        Income/         Yield/         Average        Income/         Yield/
Assets:                     Balance        Expense        Rate (3)        Balance        Expense        Rate (3)
Securities:
Taxable                   $   185,157     $      789           1.73 %   $   144,177     $      478           1.35 %
Tax-Exempt (1)                 12,846            105           3.32 %        17,897            149           3.38 %
Total Securities          $   198,003     $      894           1.83 %   $   162,074     $      627           1.57 %
Loans:
Taxable                   $ 1,008,211     $   10,599           4.26 %   $   840,368     $    9,326           4.50 %
Non-accrual                     2,586              -              - %         4,581              -              - %
Tax-Exempt (1)                  2,751             26           3.80 %         9,560            104           4.43 %
Total Loans               $ 1,013,548     $   10,625           4.25 %   $   854,509     $    9,430           4.48 %
Federal funds sold              6,384              2           0.13 %           210              -           0.08 %
Interest-bearing
deposits in other banks        38,274             15           0.16 %        60,474             12           0.08 %
Total earning assets
(2)                       $ 1,253,623     $   11,536           3.73 %   $ 1,072,686     $   10,069           3.81 %
Allowance for loan
losses                         (8,973 )                                      (7,253 )
Total non-earning
assets                         88,766                                        73,143
Total assets              $ 1,333,416                                   $ 1,138,576

Liabilities and
Shareholders' Equity:
Interest-bearing
deposits:
NOW accounts              $   165,220     $       85           0.21 %   $   130,849     $       74           0.23 %
Money market accounts         257,721            144           0.23 %       209,851            155           0.30 %
Savings accounts              175,333             26           0.06 %       144,460             21           0.06 %
Time deposits:
$250,000 and more              65,053             60           0.37 %        68,478            153           0.90 %
Less than $250,000             58,093             55           0.38 %        59,518             84           0.57 %
Total interest-bearing
deposits                  $   721,420     $      370           0.21 %   $   613,156     $      487           0.32 %
Subordinated debt                 326              -              - %             -              -              - %
Total interest-bearing
liabilities               $   721,746     $      370           0.21 %   $   613,156     $      487           0.32 %
Noninterest-bearing
liabilities:
Demand deposits               472,876                                       408,015
Other Liabilities              29,688                                        12,309
Total liabilities         $ 1,224,310                                   $ 1,033,480
Shareholders' equity          109,106                                       105,096
Total liabilities and
shareholders' equity      $ 1,333,416                                   $ 1,138,576
Net interest income                       $   11,166                                    $    9,582

Net interest spread                                            3.52 %                                        3.49 %
Interest expense as a
percent of
average earning assets                                         0.12 %                                        0.18 %
Net interest margin                                            3.61 %                                        3.62 %



(1) Income and returns are reported on a tax equivalent basis using a

rate of 21%.

(2) Unaccrued loans are not included in this total as they are not

considered productive assets.

(3) Annualized.


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The following table reconciles net interest income equivalent to taxes, which is a non-GAAP measure, to net interest income.

                                                          Three Months Ended
                                                              March 31,
                                                      2022                  2021
                                                            (in thousands)
GAAP Financial Measurements:
Interest Income - Loans                         $          10,620     $          9,408
Interest Income - Securities and Other
Interest-Earnings Assets                                      889                  608
Interest Expense - Deposits                                   370                  487
Total Net Interest Income                       $          11,139     $          9,529
Non-GAAP Financial Measurements:
Add: Tax Benefit on Tax-Exempt Interest
Income - Loans (1)                              $               5     $     

22

Add: Tax Benefit on Tax-Exempt Interest
Income - Securities (1)                                        22           

31

Total Tax Benefit on Tax-Exempt Interest
Income                                          $              27     $     

53

Tax-Equivalent Net Interest Income              $          11,166     $     

9,582

(1) The tax benefit was calculated using the federal statutory tax rate of 21%.


The tax-equivalent yield on earning assets decreased from 3.81% to 3.73% for the
three months ended March 31, 2021 and 2022, respectively. For those same time
periods, the tax-equivalent yield on securities increased 26 basis points. The
tax equivalent yield on loans decreased 23 basis points from 4.48% for the three
months ended March 31, 2021 to 4.25% for the same time period in 2022. The
decrease in the tax-equivalent yield on earning assets for the three months
ended March 31, 2022 resulted mostly from the decrease in the tax-equivalent
yield on loans. The decrease in the yield on loans as compared to the
corresponding period in 2021 was primarily due to the composition of the current
loan portfolio. Additionally, in the current rising interest rate environment,
as securities are maturing and being called or sold, they are being replaced
with securities at higher rates.

The average rate on interest bearing liabilities decreased 11 basis points from
0.32% for the three months ended March 31, 2021 to 0.21% for the same time
period in 2022. The majority of deposit growth has been in non-maturity deposit
accounts which have traditionally paid a lower interest rate than maturity
deposit accounts. The growth in lower interest rate deposit accounts and the
reduction in higher interest rate accounts as well as the repricing of those
accounts, has resulted in a lower rate paid on interest bearing liabilities.

Allowance for loan losses

The provision for loan losses is based upon management's estimate of the amount
required to maintain an adequate allowance for loan losses as discussed within
the Critical Accounting Policies section above. The allowance represents an
amount that, in management's judgment, will be adequate to absorb probable
losses inherent in the loan portfolio. Management's judgment in determining the
level of the allowance is based on evaluations of the collectability of loans
while taking into consideration such factors as trends in delinquencies and
charge-offs, changes in the nature and volume of the loan portfolio, current
economic conditions that may affect a borrower's ability to repay and the value
of collateral, overall portfolio quality and review of specific potential
losses. This evaluation is inherently subjective because it requires estimates
that are susceptible to significant revision as more information becomes
available. The amount of provision for loan losses is affected by several
factors including the growth rate of loans, net charge-offs (recoveries), and
the estimated amount of inherent losses within the loan portfolio. The provision
for loan losses for the three months ended March 31, 2022 and 2021 was $540
thousand and $599 thousand, respectively. The provision for the three months
ended March 31, 2022 and 2021 resulted mostly from loan growth during the
quarters.

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Non-interest income

Total noninterest income for the three months ended March 31, 2022 and 2021 was
$3.2 million and $2.4 million, respectively. Management reviews the activities
which generate noninterest income on an ongoing basis. The following table
provides the components of noninterest income for the three months ended
March 31, 2022 and 2021, which are included within the respective Consolidated
Statements of Income headings. Variances that the Company believes require
explanation are discussed below the table.

                                                    Three Months Ended
                                                         March 31,
(dollars in thousands)                 2022        2021       $ Change      % Change
Wealth management fees                $   921     $   607     $     314            52 %
Service charges on deposit accounts       374         253           121            48 %
Other service charges and fees            909       1,007           (98 )         (10 )%
Gain on sale of securities                  -          76           (76 )   

NM

Gain on sale of loans held for sale       478           -           478     

NM

Bank owned life insurance income          179         105            74            70 %
Other operating income                    382         379             3             1 %
Total noninterest income              $ 3,243     $ 2,427     $     816            34 %



NM - Not Meaningful

Wealth management fee income increased from 2021 to 2022. Wealth management fee
income is comprised of income from fiduciary activities as well as commissions
from the sale of non-deposit investment products. The amount of income from
fiduciary activities is determined by the number of active accounts and total
assets under management. With the addition of several new employees during 2021,
total assets under management have seen an increase during the three months
ended March 31, 2022 as well as over the second half of 2021.

Services charges on deposit accounts increased during the three months ended
March 31, 2022 when compared to the same periods in 2021. This increase is
mainly due to increases in overdraft charges. Overdraft charges can fluctuate
based on changes in customer activity.

The amount of other services charges and fees is comprised primarily of loan
servicing fee income, fees received from the Bank's credit card program and fees
generated from the Bank's ATM/debit card programs. Other service charges and
fees decreased during the three months ended March 31, 2022 when compared to the
same period in 2021. This decrease can be attributed to an decrease in fees
received from the Bank's credit card program since the Bank's credit card
portfolio has now been brought in-house.

During the second quarter of 2021, the Bank began to sell mortgage and marine
loans. During the first quarter of 2022, the Company sold $4.3 million in
mortgage loans on the secondary market and $32.5 million of marine loans from
the commercial and consumer loan portfolios. These loan sales resulted in gains
of $478 thousand during the three months ended March 31, 2022.

Bank owned life insurance ("BOLI") income was $179 thousand and $105 thousand
for the three months ended March 31, 2022 and 2021, respectively. The Company
made an investment of $10.0 million during the second quarter of 2021.

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Non-interest expenses

Total noninterest expenses increased $2.0 million or 25% for the three months
ended March 31, 2022 compared to the same period in 2021. The following table
presents the components of noninterest expense for the three months ended
March 31, 2022 and 2021, which are included within the respective Consolidated
Statements of Income headings. Variances that the Company believes require
explanation are discussed below the table.

                                                    Three Months Ended
                                                         March 31,
(dollars in thousands)                2022        2021        $ Change       % Change
Salaries and employee benefits       $ 5,952     $ 4,716     $    1,236             26 %
Occupancy expenses                       518         456             62             14 %
Equipment expenses                       257         224             33             15 %
Advertising and marketing expenses       111          79             32             41 %
Stationary and supplies                   35          38             (3 )           (8 )%
ATM network fees                         286         250             36             14 %
Other real estate owned expense            -          (1 )            1     

NM

Loss on other real estate owned            -          10            (10 )           NM
FDIC assessment                          177         107             70             65 %
Computer software expense                254         189             65             34 %
Bank franchise tax                       198         189              9              5 %
Professional fees                        464         460              4              1 %
Data processing fees                     480         402             78             19 %
Other operating expenses               1,191         797            394             49 %
Total noninterest expenses           $ 9,923     $ 7,916     $    2,007             25 %



NM - Not Meaningful

The Company's growth has had an impact on noninterest expenses. Total assets
have grown by $71.3 million or 5.47% from December 31, 2021 to March 31, 2022.
This growth has required investments to be made in the Company's infrastructure,
causing increases in salaries and employee benefits, occupancy expenses,
equipment expenses and computer software expense. In addition, increases in
asset size and capital levels have impacted both the FDIC assessment and bank
franchise tax amounts.

Salaries and employee benefits increased during the three months ended March 31,
2022 over 2021. Annual pay increases, newly hired employees, increasing
insurance costs and enhanced employee incentive plans have attributed to these
increases. The number of full-time equivalent employees (FTEs) has increased
from 195 at March 31, 2021 to 221 at March 31, 2022.

Advertising and marketing spending increased in 2022, primarily due to increased web development and increased digital marketing campaigns.

ATM network fees increased during the three months ended March 31, 2022 over
2021 due to increased ATM usage. During 2021 and 2022, increases in customer
activity have been observed.

Data processing fees increased in 2022 due to fees associated with the new general ledger system implemented in 2021.

Other operating expenses increased during the three months ended March 31, 2022
over 2021. This increase is due to increased loan related expenses due to a
higher volume, employee travel expense for training, marketing and sales
meetings, and charitable contributions in the three months ended March 31, 2022
over 2021.

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The efficiency ratio of the Company was 68.54% and 66.25% for the three months
ended March 31, 2022 and 2021, respectively. The efficiency ratio is not a
measurement under accounting principles generally accepted in the United States.
It is calculated by dividing noninterest expense by the sum of tax equivalent
net interest income and noninterest income excluding gains and losses on the
investment portfolio and other gains/losses from OREO, repossessed vehicles,
disposals of bank premises and equipment, etc. The tax rate utilized is 21%. The
Company calculates and reviews this ratio as a means of evaluating operational
efficiency.

The calculation of the efficiency ratio for the three months ended March 31,
2022 and 2021 are as follows:

                                                               Three Months Ended
                                                                    March 31,
                                                                2022          2021
                                                                 (in thousands)
Summary of Operating Results:
Noninterest expenses                                         $    9,923     $  7,916
Less: Loss on other real estate owned                                 -           10
Adjusted noninterest expenses                                $    9,923     $  7,906
Net interest income                                              11,139        9,529
Noninterest income                                                3,243        2,427
Less: Gain on sales of securities                                     -     

76

Adjusted noninterest income                                  $    3,243     $  2,351
Tax equivalent adjustment (1)                                        96     

53

Total net interest income and non-interest income, adjusted $14,478 $11,933
Efficiency report

                                                  68.54 %      66.25 %



(1) Includes tax equivalent adjustments on loans and securities according to the federal rate

statutory tax rate of 21%.

Income taxes

Income tax expense was $669 thousand and $579 thousand during the three months
ended March 31, 2022 and 2021. The effective tax rate was 17.07% and 16.83% for
the three months ended March 31, 2022 and 2021, respectively. The effective tax
rate is below the statutory rate of 21% due to tax-exempt income on investment
securities and loans. The effective tax rate is also impacted by BOLI as well as
income tax credits on qualified affordable housing project investments as
discussed in Note 12 to the Consolidated Financial Statements as well as
qualified rehabilitation credits.

                                       40
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FINANCIAL CONDITION

Securities

Total securities available for sale were $193.3 million at March 31, 2022,
compared to $192.3 million at December 31, 2021. This represents an increase of
$1.0 million or 0.54%. The Company purchased $25.8 million of securities during
the three months ended March 31, 2022. The Company had total maturities, calls,
and principal repayments of $11.1 million during the three months ended
March 31, 2022. Note 4 to the Consolidated Financial Statements provides
additional details about the Company's securities portfolio at March 31, 2022
and December 31, 2021. The Company had a net unrealized loss on available for
sale securities of $13.7 million at March 31, 2022 as compared to a net
unrealized loss of $218 thousand at December 31, 2021. Unrealized gains or
losses on available for sale securities are reported within shareholders'
equity, net of the related deferred tax effect, as accumulated other
comprehensive income (loss).  The primary cause of the unrealized losses at
March 31, 2022 and December 31,2021 was changes in market interest rates and
other market conditions and not credit concerns of the issuers. Since the losses
can be primarily attributed to changes in market interest rates and conditions
and not expected cash flows or an issuer's financial condition and management
does not intend to sell and it is likely that management will not be required to
sell the securities prior to their anticipated recovery, the unrealized losses
were deemed to be temporary.

Loan Portfolio

The Company's primary use of funds is supporting lending activities from which
it derives the greatest amount of interest income. Gross loans were $1.02
billion and $985.7 million at March 31, 2022 and December 31, 2021,
respectively. This represents an increase of $35.7 million or 3.63% during the
three months ended March 31, 2022. The ratio of gross loans to deposits
decreased slightly during the three months ended March 31, 2022 from 83.73% at
December 31, 2021 to 82.96% at March 31, 2022. Loan growth excluding changes in
SBA PPP loans during the three months ended March 31, 2022 was $43.2 million or
4.46%. SBA PPP loans were originated during 2020 and 2021 and as of March 31,
2022 $8.4 million remained outstanding, down $7.5 million or 47.22% from
December 31, 2021 due to forgiveness of the PPP loan balances.

The loan portfolio consists primarily of loans for owner-occupied single-family
dwellings and loans secured by commercial real estate. Note 5 to the
Consolidated Financial Statements provides the composition of the loan portfolio
at March 31, 2022 and December 31, 2021.

Residential real estate loans were $287.3 million or 28.13% and $292.8 million
or 29.71% of total loans at March 31, 2022 and December 31, 2021, respectively.
Commercial real estate loans were $405.7 million or 39.72% and $377.1 million or
38.25% of total loans at March 31, 2022 and December 31, 2021, respectively,
representing an increase of $28.66 million or 7.60% during the three months
ended March 31, 2022. Construction, land development, and farmland loans were
$88.0 million or 8.61% and $84.9 million or 8.61% of total loans at March 31,
2022 and December 31, 2021, respectively. Consumer installment loans were $75.3
million or 7.37% and $67.3 million or 6.83% of total loans at March 31, 2022 and
December 31, 2021, respectively, representing an increase of $8.0 million or
11.93% during the three months ended March 31, 2022. Commercial and industrial
loans were $144.8 million or 14.17% and $143.4 million or 14.55% of total loans
at March 31, 2022 and December 31, 2021, respectively. During the three months
ended March 31, 2022, loan growth was mainly concentrated in growth of our
marine lending portfolio which falls into both the consumer installment loan and
commercial and industrial loan portfolios. In addition to this strong marine
lending growth, commercial real estate loans experienced an increase during the
three months ended March 31, 2022 due largely to the expansion of the Bank's
current market area.

                                       41
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Allowance for loan losses

The purpose of, and the methods for, measuring the allowance for loan losses are
discussed in the Critical Accounting Policies section above. Note 5 to the
Consolidated Financial Statements shows the activity within the allowance for
loan losses during the three months ended March 31, 2022 and 2021 and the year
ended December 31, 2021. Charged-off loans were $47 thousand and $5 thousand for
the three months ended March 31, 2022 and 2021, respectively. Recoveries were
$35 thousand and $66 thousand for the three months ended March 31, 2022 and
2021, respectively. This resulted in net charge-offs of $12 thousand and net
recoveries of $61 thousand for the three months ended March 31, 2022 and 2021,
respectively. The ratio of net charge-offs (recoveries) to average loans was
0.00% and (0.01%) for the three months ended March 31, 2022 and 2021,
respectively. The allowance for loan losses as a percentage of loans was 0.91%
at March 31, 2022 and 0.89% at December 31, 2021. Excluding outstanding PPP
loans, the allowance for loan losses as a percentage of total loans was 0.92%
and 0.91% as of March 31, 2022 and December 31, 2021, respectively. The
percentage of the allowance for loan losses to total loans was relatively
unchanged as compared to the prior year end. The slight net increase in the
percentage was primarily due to a $76 thousand increase in specific reserves and
relatively minor updates to qualitative ranges based on historical loss
experience, while some qualitative considerations resulted in offsetting changes
during the quarter (e.g., increasing inflation and declining unemployment).
Refer to the Nonperforming Assets and Other Assets section for discussion on
nonperforming loans.

All nonaccrual and other impaired loans were evaluated for impairment and any
specific allocations were provided for as necessary. Based on management's
evaluation and update of the Company's historical loss experience adjusted for
qualitative factors assessed, the general reserve as a percentage of
non-impaired loans increased from 0.90% at December 31, 2021 to 0.91% at
March 31, 2022. Management believes that the allowance for loan losses is
currently adequate to absorb probable losses inherent in the loan portfolio.
Management will continue to evaluate the adequacy of the allowance for loan
losses as more economic data becomes available and as changes within the
Company's portfolio are known. The long-term effects of the pandemic may require
the Company to fund increases in the allowance for loan losses in future
periods.

Non-performing assets and other assets

Non-performing assets include non-accrual loans, repossessed assets, OREOs (foreclosed properties), and loans that are 90 days or more past due and still outstanding, as shown in the table below.

                                                       March 31, 2022       December 31, 2021
Nonaccrual loans                                      $          2,606     $             2,723
Loans past due 90 days and accruing interest                         -                      43
Other real estate owned and repossessed assets                       -                       -
Total nonperforming assets                            $          2,606     $             2,766

Allowance for loan losses                             $          9,315     $             8,787

Gross loans                                           $      1,021,459     $           985,720

Allowance for loan losses to nonperforming assets                  357 %                   318 %

Allowance for loan losses to total loans                          0.91 %                  0.89 %

Allowance for loan losses to nonaccrual loans                      357 %                   323 %

Nonaccrual loans to total loans                                   0.26 %                  0.28 %

Non-performing assets to period end loans and other
real estate owned                                                 0.26 %                  0.28 %




                                       42
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Nonperforming assets decreased by $117 thousand during the three months ended
March 31, 2022. Nonaccrual loans were $2.6 million and $2.7 million at March 31,
2022 and December 31, 2021. There were no OREO loans at March 31, 2022 and
December 31, 2021. The percentage of nonperforming assets to loans and OREO was
0.26% at March 31, 2022 and 0.28% at December 31, 2021, respectively. There were
no loans past due 90 days or more and still accruing interest at March 31, 2022
and $43 thousand in loans past due 90 days or more and still accruing at
December 31, 2021.

Total loans in arrears, as disclosed in Note 5 to the consolidated financial statements, decreased to $1.58 million to March 31, 2022 compared to $1.63 million to December 31, 2021.

During the three months ended March 31, 2022, the Bank placed five loans
totaling $358 thousand on nonaccrual status. Management evaluates the financial
condition of borrowers and the value of any collateral on nonaccrual loans. The
results of these evaluations are used to estimate the amount of losses which may
be realized on the disposition of these nonaccrual loans and are reflected in
the allowance for loan losses.

Loans are placed on nonaccrual status when collection of principal and interest
is doubtful, generally when a loan becomes 90 days past due. There are three
negative implications for earnings when a loan is placed on non-accrual status.
First, all interest accrued but unpaid at the date that the loan is placed on
non-accrual status is either deducted from interest income or written off as a
loss. Second, accruals of interest are discontinued until it becomes certain
that both principal and interest can be repaid. Finally, there may be actual
losses to principal that require additional provisions for loan losses to be
charged against earnings.

For real estate loans, upon foreclosure, the balance of the loan is transferred
to OREO and carried at the fair value of the property based on current
appraisals and other current market trends, less estimated selling costs. If a
write down of the OREO property is necessary at the time of foreclosure, the
amount is charged-off to the allowance for loan losses. A review of the recorded
property value is performed in conjunction with normal loan reviews, and if
market conditions indicate that the recorded value exceeds the fair value,
additional write downs of the property value are charged directly to operations.

In addition, the Company may, under certain circumstances, restructure loans in
troubled debt restructurings as a concession to a borrower when the borrower is
experiencing financial distress. Formal, standardized loan restructuring
programs are not utilized by the Company. Each loan considered for restructuring
is evaluated based on customer circumstances and may include modifications to
one or more loan provisions. Such restructured loans are included in impaired
loans. However, restructured loans are not necessarily considered nonperforming
assets. At March 31, 2022, the Company had $2.6 million in restructured loans
with specific allowances totaling $39 thousand. At December 31, 2021, the
Company had $2.7 million in restructured loans with specific allowances totaling
$39 thousand. At March 31, 2022 and December 31, 2021, total restructured loans
performing under the restructured terms and accruing interest were $2.5 million.
Two loans, totaling $145 thousand, were in nonaccrual status at March 31, 2022.
Two loans, totaling $149 thousand, were in nonaccrual status at December 31,
2021.

Deposits

Total deposits were $1.23 billion and $1.18 billion at March 31, 2022 and
December 31, 2021, respectively. This represents an increase of $54.1 million or
4.59% during the three months ended March 31, 2022. Note 7 to the Consolidated
Financial Statements provides the composition of total deposits at March 31,
2022 and December 31, 2021. The growth in deposits was organic growth as we
expand and grow into newer market areas.

Noninterest-bearing demand deposits, which are comprised of checking accounts,
increased $19.1 million or 4.05% from $470.4 million at December 31, 2021 to
$489.4 million at March 31, 2022. Savings and interest-bearing demand deposits,
which include NOW accounts, money market accounts and regular savings accounts
increased $35.9 million or 6.16% from $583.3 million at December 31, 2021 to
$619.2 million at March 31, 2022. Time deposits decreased $911 thousand or .074%
from $123.6 million at December 31, 2021 to $122.7 million at March 31, 2022.

                                       43
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CAPITAL RESOURCES

The Bank continues to be a well capitalized financial institution. Total
shareholders' equity at March 31, 2022 was $102.1 million, reflecting a
percentage of total assets of 7.43%, as compared to $110.3 million and 8.46% at
December 31, 2021. The reason for the decrease in shareholders' equity during
the first quarter of 2022 was due to the unrealized loss recognized on the
securities available for sale portfolio. During the three months ended March 31,
2022 and 2021, the Company declared dividends of $0.28 and $0.27 per share,
respectively. The Company has a Dividend Investment Plan that allows
shareholders to reinvest dividends in Company stock.

At March 31, 2022, the Bank met all capital adequacy requirements and had
regulatory capital ratios in excess of the levels established for
well-capitalized institutions. The Bank monitors these ratios on a quarterly
basis and has several strategies, including without limitation the issuance of
common stock, to ensure that these ratios remain above regulatory minimums.

On September 17, 2019, the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation finalized a
rule that introduces an optional simplified measure of capital adequacy for
qualifying community banking organizations (i.e., the community bank leverage
ratio or "CBLR" framework), as required by the Economic Growth, Regulatory
Relief and Consumer Protection Act. The CBLR framework is designed to reduce
burden by removing the requirements for calculating and reporting risk-based
capital ratios for qualifying community banking organizations that opt into the
framework. In order to qualify for the CBLR framework, a community banking
organization must have a tier 1 leverage ratio of greater than 9 percent, less
than $10 billion in total consolidated assets, and limited amounts of
off-balance-sheet exposures and trading assets and liabilities. A qualifying
community banking organization that opts into the CBLR framework and meets all
requirements under the framework will be considered to have met the
well-capitalized ratio requirements under the Prompt Corrective Action
regulations and will not be required to report or calculate risk-based capital.
Under the final rule, an eligible banking organization may opt out and revert to
the risk-weighting framework without restriction. As a qualifying community
banking organization, the Bank elected to measure its capital adequacy under the
CBLR framework as of March 31, 2022 and it's leverage ratio was 9.84%. At
December 31, 2021, the Bank utilized the risk-based capital rules to assess its
capital adequacy and it's leverage, tier 1, common equity tier 1, and total
capital ratios were 8.84%, 10.44%, 10.44%, and 11.30%, respectively. Through
April 30, 2022, the Bank's capital ratios continued to exceed the regulatory
minimums for well-capitalized institutions. We are closely monitoring our
capital position and are taking appropriate steps to ensure our level of capital
remains strong. Our capital, while significant, may fluctuate in future periods
and limit our ability to pay dividends.

On March 31, 2022, the Company entered into Subordinated Note Purchase
Agreements with certain purchasers pursuant to which the Company issued and sold
$30.0 million in aggregate principal amount of its 4.50% Fixed-to-Floating Rate
Subordinated Notes due April 1, 2032 (the "Notes"). See Note 14 to the
Consolidated Financial Statements included in this Form 10-Q, for discussion of
subordinated debt.

LIQUIDITY

Liquidity management involves meeting the present and future financial
obligations of the Company with the sale or maturity of assets or with the
occurrence of additional liabilities. Liquidity needs are met with cash on hand,
deposits in banks, federal funds sold, securities classified as available for
sale and loans maturing within one year. At March 31, 2022, liquid assets
totaled $395.0 million as compared to $365.1 million at December 31, 2021. These
amounts represent 31.05% and 30.61% of total liabilities at March 31, 2022 and
December 31, 2021, respectively. The Company minimizes liquidity demand by
utilizing core deposits to fund asset growth. Securities provide a constant
source of liquidity through paydowns and maturities. Also, the Company maintains
short-term borrowing arrangements, namely federal funds lines of credit, with
larger financial institutions as an additional source of liquidity. The Bank's
membership with the Federal Home Loan Bank of Atlanta provides a source of
borrowings with numerous rate and term structures. The Company's senior
management monitors the liquidity position regularly and attempts to maintain a
position which utilizes available funds most efficiently.


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OFF-BALANCE SHEET ARRANGEMENTS AND CONTRACTUAL OBLIGATIONS

There were no material changes in off-balance sheet arrangements and contractual obligations, as disclosed in the 2021 Form 10-K.

                                       45

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